1 – Mainsail;
2 – Staysail / Jib
3 – Spinnaker
4 – Hull
5 – Keel
6 – Rudder
7 – Skeg
8 – Spar/Mast
9 – Spreader
10 – Shroud
11 – Sheet
12 – Boom
14 – Spinnaker Pole
15 – Backstay
16 – Forestay
17 – Boom Vang;

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  • Backstay
    A backstay runs from the mast to the rear quarter, counteracting the forestay and jib.
  • Boom
    In sailing, a boom is a spar (pole), along the foot of a fore and aft rigged sail,[1] that greatly improves control of the angle and shape of the sail. The primary action of the boom is to keep the foot flatter when the sail angle is away from the centerline of the boat. The […]
  • Boom Vang
    A boom vang (US) or kicking strap (UK) is a line or piston system on a sailboat used to exert downward force on the boom and thus control the shape of the sail. The Collins English Dictionary defines it as “A rope or tackle extended from the boom of a fore-and-aft mainsail to a deck […]
  • Forestay
    On a sailing vessel, a forestay, sometimes just called a stay, is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. It is attached either at the very top of the mast, or in fractional rigs between about 1/8 and 1/4 from the top of the mast. The other end of the […]
  • Hull
    The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. Reference: Wikipedia
  • Jib
    A jib is a triangular sail that sets ahead of the foremast of a sailing vessel. Its tack is fixed to the bowsprit, to the bows, or to the deck between the bowsprit and the foremost mast. Jibs and spinnakers are the two main types of headsails on a modern boat. Reference: Wikipedia
  • Keel
    On boats and ships, keel can refer to either of two parts: a structural element that sometimes resembles a fin and protrudes below a boat along the central line, or a hydrodynamic element. These parts overlap. As the laying down of the keel is the initial step in the construction of a ship, in British […]
  • Mainsail
    A mainsail is a sail located behind the main mast of a sailing vessel.
  • Mast
    The mast of a sailing vessel is a tall spar, or arrangement of spars, erected more or less vertically on the centre-line of a ship or boat. Its purposes include carrying sail, spars, and derricks, and giving necessary height to a navigation light, look-out position, signal yard, control position, radio aerial or signal lamp. Large […]
  • Rudder
    A rudder is a primary control surface used to steer a ship, boat, submarine, hovercraft, aircraft, or other conveyance that moves through a fluid medium (generally air or water). On an aircraft the rudder is used primarily to counter adverse yaw and p-factor and is not the primary control used to turn the airplane. A […]
  • Sheet
    In sailing, a sheet is a line (rope, cable or chain) used to control the movable corner(s) (clews) of a sail. Reference: Wikipedia
  • Shroud
    On a sailboat, the shrouds are pieces of standing rigging which hold the mast up from side to side. There is frequently more than one shroud on each side of the boat. Usually a shroud will connect at the top of the mast, and additional shrouds might connect partway down the mast, depending on the […]
  • Skeg
    A skeg, (skegg or skag) is a sternward extension of the keel of boats and ships which have a rudder mounted on the centre line. The term also applies to the lowest point on an outboard motor or the outdrive of an inboard/outboard. In more recent years, the name has been used for a fin […]
  • Spinnaker
    A spinnaker is a sail designed specifically for sailing off the wind from a reaching course to a downwind, i.e. with the wind 90°–180° off bow. The spinnaker fills with wind and balloons out in front of the boat when it is deployed, called flying. It is constructed of lightweight fabric, usually nylon, and is […]
  • Spinnaker Pole
    A spinnaker pole is a spar used in sailboats (both dinghys and yachts) to help support and control a variety of headsails, particularly the spinnaker. However, it is also used with other sails, such as genoas and jibs, when sailing downwind with no spinnaker hoisted. (Since the load on a spinnaker pole is very light […]
  • Spreader
    A spreader is a spar on a sailboat used to deflect the shrouds to allow them to better support the mast. Often, there are multiples, called spreaders. The spreader or spreaders serve much the same purpose as the crosstrees and tops in a traditional sailing vessel. Spreader design and tuning can be quite complex. The […]
  • Staysail
    A staysail is a fore-and-aft rigged sail whose luff can be affixed to a stay running forward (and most often but not always downwards) from a mast to the deck, the bowsprit, or to another mast. Reference: Wikipedia
  • Tiller
    A lever used for steering, attached to the top of the rudder post. Used mainly on smaller vessels, such as dinghies and rowing boats.